By Published On: 21 August 20121.7 min read

As we have discussed before if you are suffering from dry eyes and you go to the chemist there is literally a wall of options.

So how do you choose? Ask the pharmacist? Ask the sixteen year old behind the counter?  Believe it or not this is what happens a lot of the time!

Before choosing eye drops it is actually important to have them prescribed for your particular type of dry eyes. There are two main types:

1. Aqueous deficiency

2. Lipid deficiency

Often it is a combination of both with eye allergies and in-complete blinking thrown in for good measure.

At The Eye Practice we take Dry Eyes seriously and make sure we are clear with what is contributing to your problem.  Rarely will we prescribe dry eye drops that are in a bottle.  Why?  They are loaded with preservatives – why would you want them in your eyes?  Dry Eyes typically are inflamed and sore. Preservatives actually cause inflammation so do not get bottled eye drops.  Insist on non-preserved ampules. You can reuse an ampule for the whole day as long as the tip does not touch anything that might contaminate it.

Now that we are clear about not using preserved drops what is next?  We need to classify whether we need water based drops or oil based drops depending on the type of dry eyes that are present.  From previous posts we know that the majority of dry eyes are in fact oil deficient. A recent study showed that 86% of patients presenting to a specialty clinic for dry eye treatment had some form of oil deficiency.

Only recently a NON-PRESERVED oil based eye drop called ARTELAC by Bausch & Lomb has been released that shows tremendous promise in treating most cases of dry eyes.

We now have this unique product in stock. Call us on (02) 9290 1899 for a supply OR better still come in and get your eyes looked at so that we can work out what type of dry eyes you have so we can treat them appropriately.

Comments

4 Comments

  1. Jamie 30 October 2012 at 2:41 pm - Reply

    Hi Jim, couldn’t agree more in saying that many preservative-based OTC drops often do more harm than good. I’ve been down this road and it can be very uncomfortable! As you suggest, there are good p-free drops available that can and do provide a level of comfort for people.

    Personally, however, I believe the underlying causes can be rectified – as they were for me – rather than addressing the symptoms. Given the overwhelming anecdotal evidence I’ve read, many people try all manner of symptom relief treatments for years and never show much improvement.

    It’s good to see more dry eye specialists out there.

    Best
    Jamie

    • Dr Jim Kokkinakis 1 April 2013 at 4:19 pm - Reply

      Dear Jamie
      Sorry I have taken so long in replying. Most people try OTC eye drops for red, dry eyes, which in most cases have preservatives.
      Dry eyes is multifactorial. What this means is that there are many causes of dry eyes many of which as you say need to be attended to before dry eyes can be controlled properly.
      Thank you for you interest and contribution to this most frustrating topic.
      Regards
      Jim Kokkinakis
      Optometrist
      Sydney CBD

  2. Mariana 17 April 2016 at 9:41 am - Reply

    ¿WIch is the name of this eye drop non preserved oil based?

    • Jim Kokkinakis 15 August 2017 at 8:25 am - Reply

      One that requires prescription is Restasis.

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